Social Justice Community Counseling


Our focus on social justice gets to the heart of creating systemic change via social justice initiatives, client advocacy, emphasis on traditionally marginalized groups, working with cultural and sexual diversity, and competent multicultural counseling when working with adults and families.

Social Justice Community Counseling

Electives (Choose 3; 9 credits)

  • Psychology of Gender
  • Advanced Couples and Family Counseling
  • Sexualities
  • Advocacy and Social Justice Counseling (*required)
  • Independent Research
Core Courses (39 credits)

This course addresses theories of career choice across the life span, along with cultural and social justice influences that impact experience of work. Career development theories, approaches to career decision-­‐making, personality, assessment, and career exploration techniques are addressed. Theoretical explorations include trait and type approaches, work adjustment, and Myers-­‐Briggs approaches. Culturally competent career counseling across the lifespan is addressed.

This course will address the major processes of human development from conception to death. Discussion will focus on critical examination of traditional and contemporary theories of human development focusing on physical, cognitive, social and emotional development across the human life span. Culturally competent implications for counseling will be addressed.

This course examines counseling research methods used to study human behavior and counseling processes. Research designs including experimental, correlation and survey methods are examined. Course topics include the design of psychological research, data collection, basic data analysis, data interpretation and preparing an American Psychological Association research report. Students will be introduced to the elemental functions of statistical analysis software.

This course addresses ethical and professional issues in counseling including the history of counseling psychology, the roles and functions of professional counselors and the processes involved in ethical decision making. Other topics to be discussed include: privileged communication, confidentiality, rights of the client and agency, civil commitment, and licensure. Legal, moral and ethical issues in professional counseling, including employing culturally competent interventions, will be examined.

This course will provide an introduction to human mental distress and abnormal behavior with a particular emphasis on cultural and sociopolitical contexts. Symptoms, causes, treatment, assessment, classification and diagnosis of various psychological disorders will be addressed from a strengths--­oriented perspective. The biological, psychological, social and sociocultural factors involved in the development of various psychological disorders will be examined. Research related to the etiology of psychological disorders and the efficacy of current treatments, including current trends in psychopharmacology, will be presented. Students will learn how mental health problems are categorized and develop applied skills in diagnostic interviewing.

This course addresses the theoretical approaches used in counseling, therapy and intervention. A goal of the course is to allow students with an interest in human services to better understand the options open to both counselors and clients when engaging in counseling and therapeutic processes. Students are encouraged to think about how the various approaches might fit with their personal style and beliefs about counseling. This course provides a foundation of knowledge about the major theories by addressing ethical issues in counseling, counseling terminology, the major contributors, and the culturally appropriate use of theories and interventions in the context of human development.

The experiential course addresses various approaches to group counseling and therapy. Students will learn about the theories and practices of group therapy, stages of group development and the therapeutic factors that are effective when utilizing this counseling modality. In addition, students will participate as a group member in an applied classroom group that fosters experiential learning.

This experiential lab-based course addresses basic and advanced skills used in counseling and helping relationships. The focus is on developing the core skills necessary to facilitate effective helping relationships while being mindful of culturally appropriate interventions. Students will apply and practice a variety of counseling skills and techniques including active listening, reflection skills, immediacy, verbal and non-verbal attending behavior, encouraging, summarizing and paraphrasing. Training is done through the use of video feedback and in-­class practice demonstrations involving personal disclosure, role­-play, and group and instructor feedback.

This multicultural counseling course will introduce students to a variety of psychological concepts about intersecting identities and culture and how they affect interactions with others. This course focuses on understanding and working with diverse populations across dimensions including but not limited to ethnicity, race, gender, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, gender identity, ability status, age, and religion with a particular emphasis on ethnicity. Current theoretical and research literature regarding multiculturally competent counseling practices will be addressed. Students will identify and explore their own unique ethnic and cultural worldviews and see how it affects their counseling approaches. Students are simultaneously encouraged to reflect upon one’s own sense of self, beliefs, assumptions, behaviors and social power in an effort to increase multicultural awareness and competence.

This theoretical and applied course addresses the major principles, approaches, and theoretical perspectives utilized in psychological measurement and assessment. This course involves discussion of the theory and application of psychological measures of intellectual functioning, achievement, aptitude, interests, attitudes and personality. Culturally competent approaches to counseling assessment are addressed. Students will have the opportunity to gain first-­hand experience administering and taking various assessment instruments. Multiple testing contexts are addressed including educational, psychological research, counseling and guidance.

This course helps students to develop necessary basic culturally-­competent counseling skills to prepare for an internship in a variety of counseling settings. Students will engage in a 100-­hour practicum placement in order to gain initial clinical experience in an agency setting. Of the 100 hours, 40 hours must be in direct clinical contact. The weekly practicum seminar is designed to provide support and supervision for students in their ongoing development as counseling practitioners. The goal is to increase awareness of the clinical & ethical skills needed to function in a professional role, gain experience with the daily operations of a counseling organization and develop an appreciation of multiculturally competent clinical practices. Students are required to carry malpractice insurance for the duration of the clinical placement.

Students are required to engage in 600 clinical internship hours over the course of one year, 300 of which have to be in direct client contact. The weekly internship seminar is designed to provide support and supervision for students in their ongoing development as counseling practitioners. The goal is to continue to develop awareness of the clinical & ethical skills needed to function in a professional role, gain additional experiences with the daily operations of a counseling organization and develop an appreciation of multiculturally competent clinical practices. Students will demonstrate oral and written case conceptualization skills. Students are required to carry malpractice insurance for the duration of the clinical placement.
Prerequisite: Practicum

Students are required to engage in 600 clinical internship hours over the course of one year, 300 of which have to be in direct client contact. The weekly internship seminar is designed to provide support and supervision for students in their ongoing development as counseling practitioners. The goal is to further awareness of the clinical & ethical skills needed to function in a professional role, gain additional experiences with the daily operations of a counseling organization and develop an appreciation of multiculturally competent clinical practices. Students will demonstrate oral and written case conceptualization skills. Internship with Seminar II serves as a capstone course where students will complete a final project that showcases their clinical, professional and personal development over the course of the program. Students are required to carry malpractice insurance for the duration of the clinical placement.
Prerequisite: Internship with Seminar I

Contact
Allison Keene, Administrative Director